March 4, 2015

The Cock Inn mentioned in The Telegraph

We have once again been featured in The Telegraph, this time in an article called ‘Pub signs of the time’. This is about how the names of pubs are rich reminders of British history, which shouldn’t be changed because of how they may sound or what they may evoke today.

Our beautiful pub dates back to the 17th century, when it was then known as The Cock Horse.

Here is a copy of the full article:

The Cock Inn at Sarratt

“Pub names are among those details of British life that embody history. The Marquess of Granby or the Royal Oak refer to stirring events from the past. Even a Dog and Duck or Red Cow are more historical than names that invoke Slugs or Ferrets just because they sounded funny, at first.

So it is a shame if a brewery insists on changing the name that the Labour in Vain, in Yarnfield, Staffordshire, has borne for 160 years. It is true that in recent decades the pub sign had shown a black boy being scrubbed in a tub by a motherly looking white woman. But the sign was taken down and, as ignorant officials who poked their noses into the case should be aware, that was not the name’s origin.

The Victorians knew it was from Psalm 127, familiar from Monteverdi or Handel’s settings: “Except the Lord build the house, they labour in vain that build it.” To change it now would be vain indeed.”

 

Taken from The Telegraph

Categories: General

Leave a reply